Sweet Spot

Illustrated Definition

sweet-spotThe sweet spot is a specific area of the clubface, found within the perimeter defined by the grooves. It represents the precise area where the golf ball should be hit for optimal results. Highly skilled golfers will be able to hit the ball within the sweetspot consistently whereas average ones will struggle to.

Sweet Spots of Varying Sizes

sweet-spot-comparisonGolf clubs have sweet spots that vary in size from club to club. For example, the driver is often the club with the largest sweet spot. Through the introduction of lighter materials such as titanium club manufacturers are now able to produce clubs with much larger heads while keeping the weight under acceptable levels. The larger head provides for more forgiveness, allowing players to hit the ball across different points on the face while still technically hitting the sweet spot. Contrast that with hybrids, which don’t come close to having the same height in their sweet spots. A golfer will thus need to  make sure not to place the ball too high on a tee if using it for the first stroke on a hole.

Sweet spot Expansion Through Perimeter Weighting

perimeter-weightThe introduction and use of perimeter weighting has allowed for the enlargement of the sweet spot. This is achieved by the hollowing out of heavy metal at the back of the clubhead – as is the case in cavity back clubs – and its redistribution towards the outer edges of the club. The final result is a club that has a larger clubface, on which a larger sweet spot can be found.

Impact Decals

sweet-spot-impact-decalsDirty golf balls will often leave temporary marks on clubfaces that make it possible for a golfer to quickly identify if a particular shot was hit on the sweet spot or not. If in need for more precise results and in order to reliably verify where the ball actually hits the clubface a golfer can elect to stick a piece of tape to the clubface during a practice session. These tapes – called impact decals – are self-adhesive and stick to the surface of the clubface and change colors at the point of impact, i.e., where the ball actually strikes the tape.